Saturday, March 26, 2016

The Sound of Music - Part 5

Welcome to the fifth and final installment of the Sound of Music - My Top Five Albums Of All Time. 

My "deserted island" list of albums I'd want to have with me if I were stranded is almost complete. Thus far I've presented the following (in no particular order): 
As a reminder, I present my main decision-making criteria:
  • Number of songs I like on the album (the fewer songs I skip over, the better)
  • Composition of the album (are the songs arranged in an order I find pleasing)
  • Memories invoked when I hear a song from the album
  • Emotional impact of the album (how does listening to it make me feel?)
Today, we complete the list with an album that literally helped define a generation. By many it is not viewed in the same regard as, say, Nevermind by Nirvana, but in my opinion, this album was more complex, richer experience that touched a much broader audience. 

Without further ado, I present ...

Source: Wikipedia
Released 1991
Track Listing: 
  1. "Once"  (9/10)
  2. "Even Flow" (9/10)
  3. "Alive" (10/10)
  4. "Why Go" (9/10)
  5. "Black" (9/10)
  6. "Jeremy"  (10/10)
  7. "Oceans"  (8/10)
  8. "Porch" (8/10)
  9. "Garden"  (8/10)
  10. "Deep" (9/10)
  11. "Release" (10/10)
I like every song on this album. In fact, I've liked every song on this album since the moment it was released. If I were to rank each song from one to eleven the songs at the bottom, Oceans, Porch, and Garden end up bouncing around in my head for hours after hearing them.

I completely understand why the producer decided to open with the song "Once". It's a powerful song and within the first minute of the song the lyrics, "Once upon a time I could control myself / Once upon a time I could lose myself" tell us that we're about to embark on a fairytale journey like none other. Followed by "Even Flow" these two tracks make you feel like all you've been doing is climbing, then, without warning like the first big drop on a roller coaster we hear "Alive", a song just as powerful as any of the others but slightly down tempo. Not to have us get lulled into a false sense of security the album hits back with a 1-2 punch with "Why Go" and then "Black" only to follow up with probably the most iconic opening bass line in the band's catalog on "Jeremy". The album continues with songs that alternate between laying low a little and jumping right up in your face until we get to the last song on the track. As far as album endings go "Release" is a formidable choice for the end of this wild ride, though I have to admit that it's just as fitting to have it as a live show opener. All in all, the songs on Ten are perfectly arranged and are a pleasure to listen to on their own, in order as they are on the album, or randomized on an iPod with a thousand other songs. 

This album makes me feel like jumping around and yelling. Occassionally, a song will come on that's one of the slower ones and instead of jumping around and yelling it will just magnify whatever feeling I am having in that moment. The themes of the album are dark and uncomfortable and complex, and the feelings it invokes are the same. But most of all, it makes me feel like jumping around and yelling. 

There are too many memories involving this album to list them all here. I remember one of my longest standing childhood friends driving us to a party and saying, "I'm feeling kind of grunge tonight" and putting PJ on in the car. I remember countless days and nights "studying" with Riaz; half written physics equations haphazardly scribbled on scrap paper and Riaz with his guitar in hand and Pearl Jam on the CD player. They are the go-to concert for another friend of mine and I've had the pleasure of seeing them a couple times with him. I should have seen PJ in New Orleans with him back in 1995 but this girl I worked with wouldn't switch shifts with me (which was a total jerk move, if you ask me). 

Probably the coolest memory I have involves the pop/ska band The English Beat. I was in Ottawa, Ontario, standing a few rows from the stage with my Pearl Jam tour buddy and Pearl Jam launched into their hit song "Betterman". They extended the ending and out of nowhere started singing the English Beat's "Save It For Later". Fast forward five years and I'm in Waterloo, Ontario (a solid six-hour drive from Ottawa) and I'm in a small club watching the English Beat with my wife when right in the middle of their song "Save It For Later" they start playing a few bars of Pearl Jam's "Betterman". I figure I was the only person there who had that experience and every time either of those songs come on my iPod I think of those two concert moments. Also, if you've never experienced the crowd participation at a Pearl Jam concert, you are truly missing out. I only need to speak two words on this topic: Baba O'Riley. Look it up on YouTube

So there you have it, my top five albums of all time. Next time, I'll put the songs in order and give you a list of great albums that didn't quite make the top five cut but are worth checking out nonetheless. 

~ Andrew

Friday, March 11, 2016

You Have Memories To Look Back On Today

Chuck Wendig has issued a flash fiction challenge. Write a story in five sentences and fewer than 100 words. Seeing as I write a little something to commemorate the passing of my brother-in-law, Ryan, on my birthday (March 13) I decided I'd use this flash fiction challenge as a means to do that.

Here's what I came up with:



Seven years ago we lost him. Recently, Facebook introduced a memories feature that recaps your day from years past. I've been wondering what those memories would look like from the day he died and how I would deal with them. Turning memories off altogether, or for a specific day, is an option but that day is also my birthday. I will leave the feature on and try to create more good memories so I will be reminded of how much I am loved as I scroll ... scroll ... scroll towards the bottom and remember how much he is missed.



~ Andrew